In Memoriam – Jett

June 4th, 2019 by Laurie Brush

Jett’s Story:
Jett was an amazing blessing to our family. Through all the transitions of life; education, careers, multiple moves, and multiple children, he was the constant. We had never had a dog before and he was better than we deserved. We didn’t know what we were doing at first, but he was the kind of partner that never required cages, boarding, leashes, anything. He was fiercely loyal, patient, and gentle. It was almost unfair to him, but we were able to hold him to a higher standard than just being a pet. He was family and he never disappointed. We love you Jetter and you will always be a part of us all.

Dr. Laura and the staff members we worked with (primarily Kathryn and Mary) were all amazing. They were patient, empathetic, and always took the time to answer all our questions. We truly felt they cared for our situation uniquely and could see it on Dr. Laura’s face when the time had come. We give this group so much credit to have to do this type of position daily, but even through that, they were never cold or calculated. Thank God for people like this, who made what felt like an impossible decision and time, at least bearable, so that we could do the right thing and give our family member dignity and peace at the end. There was never any fear like he would have had, had we done this any other way. We will be forever grateful for that.


In Memoriam – Mackinac Island Fall Colors

May 16th, 2019 by Laurie Brush

Mackinac Island Fall Colors’s Story:
It has been a little more than 2 weeks since our little buddy, Mackinac, went to the Rainbow Bridge…April 29, 2019. He was just shy of 15. He came to live in our hearts and home when he was just 8 weeks old.

We are just getting to the point where we can talk about the countless memories we have, without tearing up. We knew this would be difficult, but really didn’t understand how very much. Making it all the more difficult is that Mac was such a special dog. Everyone who knew him would comment that “there must be a little human somewhere inside that dog body!”

He had a wonderful life with us, and we with him. We vacationed as a family all these years, and he was a better traveler than any PEOPLE we know! He had a good old time with other dogs…dog parks and daycare. He loved exploring the woods, and you had to really keep the wild-child in control when he even looked at a beach!

Someday, we will welcome a new dog. We will have to be careful not to compare, as we will never have another dog like Mackinac.

Always knew Mac would NOT have his life ended on a cold, hard vet’s table. Knew of Heaven at Home for quite awhile. Could not have done this without Dr Laurie. You have no idea how grateful we are that you are providing this service. Thank you! Thank you!


In Memoriam – Miss Daisy

May 14th, 2019 by Laurie Brush

Miss Daisy’s Story:
I adopted Miss Daisy just two years ago. She came from a home with large dogs and was kind of pushed by the wayside, as she was just a thirteen pound little girl, and never got the love and attention she deserved. When she came to our home, she was loved and her new sister, Bella, became her best friend as though they had always been together. She loved to go for walks, even with her short little legs, having to be carried part of the way – she certainly enjoyed the outdoors. She also never missed the opportunity for a car ride. When it was time to go somewhere, she would dance around with her tail just a wagging. She certainly was a happy little girl. Miss Daisy, you will be terribly missed by your sister Bella and your mom. The good Lord will love you and take care of you until we all meet again.

Many, many thanks to Dr. Brush and her office staff. The several times I came to the office to get medicine, everyone was so kind and compassionate. A special thanks to Dr. Brush for helping Miss Daisy pass so peacefully, in my arms, where she knew she was loved. Again, thank you, you’re the angel in our fur babies lives.


In Memoriam – Ziggy Keeler

April 16th, 2019 by Laurie Brush

Ziggy’s Story:
Ziggy was a character. We met 16 years ago right after I graduated from high school. I went to the local shelter to adopt a kitten that would be my first pet to have on my own. The kittens weren’t ready so my sister and I walked around to see the kitties. I opened his cage and turned to talk to my sister. He leaped out and hung from the back of my shirt. He clearly picked me as his momma and was NOT going to let me leave without him. He was a mess. Had a terrible cold so he had a snotty nose and breath that could knock you out, but he was mine. A month later, after several experiments, we finally figured out he was deaf. This sweet boy has gone through all of my adult life experiences with me and I could always count on him. Even though he couldn’t hear me, he would always be the first to greet me with his crazy meow. He was always so happy to see me – even if I went to the bathroom he would act as if I had been gone for a week and would be happy to see me. His meow you could hear at least a block away and I had to use it several times to track him down when he escaped. He caught himself on fire more times than I can count from candles. He literally smothered me with love. He didn’t care what was going on, he just wanted to love you.

He was my best friend and I miss him so much. It has only been a week but the hole he has left is unbearable. I just hope at the end he knew that I loved him as much as he loved me.


Is Lepto Lurking in That Puddle?

April 11th, 2019 by Heaven At Home Staff

Spring rains bring flowers, but pet peril can lurk in standing water, mud puddles, and even swollen rivers and ponds. Invisible bacteria, 250 strains strong, lurk in warm, wet, stagnant areas. Leptospira can fight for survival for months in these areas after being shed by wildlife and rodents when they urinate.

Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease, meaning it can affect both dogs and humans, and be transmitted from dogs to humans. It can cause severe kidney or liver failure, meningitis, difficulty breathing, and in some cases, lead to death. In some dogs, for reasons unknown, it can also be asymptomatic.

In recent years, pet health officials have watched the incidence rate increase across North America, so much so that the AKC Canine Health Foundation has funded two studies this year to explore the prevalence of “Lepto” and the immune response in dogs exposed to the bacteria.

While flood-prone areas and hurricane sites are at particular risk, Michigan is not immune to Lepto outbreaks. Statewide, incidents have been on the rise since 2015, according to the Michigan Veterinary Medical Association.

“Anywhere you have wildlife, leptospirosis can be spread into the environment through their urine,” said Dr. Laurie Brush, founder of Heaven at Home Pet Hospice.

“Prevention, and early detection, are paramount for your pet’s health,” she said. Ten to 15% of dogs diagnosed and treated will still succumb to the disease.

In order for a dog to get leptospirosis, they must have contact with an infected animal’s urine, which enters the body through wounds or mucous membranes (eyes, open mouth). Dogs most often get Lepto by drinking out of stagnant water sources, such as puddles.

Early signs of Lepto include: 

  • Loss of appetite
  • Increase or decrease in urine production
  • Uncharacteristic inactivity
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Abdominal pain
  • Severe weakness and depression
  • Stiffness
  • Fever

The Veterinary community suspects that the cause of the rise in cases is two-fold. The CDC is investigating the appearance of new serovars, or strains of the bacteria. The vaccine does not protect against all strains. In addition, since the vaccine only lasts for a year, it is now typically delivered separately from core three-year vaccines, which gives pet parents the opportunity to skip the vaccination.

“While the vaccine is imperfect, it is the best prevention available against this disease. With such serious consequences, it’s worth discussion with your routine care veterinarian,” Dr. Brush said.

Even if your pet is vaccinated, avoid allowing them to drink standing water or eat animal carcasses since the vaccine does not inoculate against all strains of Leptospira.

Remember that early diagnosis is critical for an improved outlook, so if your pet shows early signs and is deteriorating quickly, treat it as an emergency. And since Leptospirosis can be transmitted to humans, practice good hygiene.

CDC Guidelines for Handling Pets with Leptospirosis:

  • Do not handle or come in contact with urine, blood, or tissues from your infected pet before it has received proper treatment.
  • If you need to have contact with animal tissues or urine, wear protective clothing, such as gloves and boots, especially if you are occupationally at risk (veterinarians, farm workers, and sewer workers).
  • As a general rule, always wash your hands after handling your pet or anything that might have your pet’s excrement on it.
  • If you are cleaning surfaces that may be contaminated or have urine from an infected pet on them, use an antibacterial cleaning solution or a solution of 1 part household bleach in 10 parts water.
  • Make sure that your infected pet takes all of its medicine and follow up with your veterinarian.

Identifying and Coping with Canine Cognitive Dysfunction

April 1st, 2019 by Heaven At Home Staff

Fido finds himself in a corner and seems confused. Lately, he’s spent hours staring into space. He doesn’t feel like playing with his human. Other times, he gets stuck behind furniture or acts afraid of people he once greeted joyfully. Sometimes he barks for no reason, and paces at night. And then there were those “accidents” on the living room floor, right after he’d been outside…

Fido’s loyal human thinks these are just symptoms of old age. But Fido knows something’s not right.

These symptoms, among others, could point to Canine Cognitive Dysfunction Syndrome (CCD), a disease similar to Alzheimer’s, where tissue changes in the brain block normal communication between neurons. Both Humans and dogs can develop beta-amyloid plaques on their brains.

As many as 85% of CCD cases are undiagnosed, according to the Washington State University’s Veterinary Teaching Hospital. And while there is no cure, there are things you can do to help.

“The goal is to slow the disease’s progress and improve the quality of life. Treatment may involve medication, an enhanced diet, and management of the environment and behavior,” said Dr. Laurie Brush, founder of Heaven at Home Pet Hospice.

“For example, ensuring play, structured social interaction and exposure to sunlight will help with engagement and regulation of the sleep-wake cycle.”

The first step, she said, is to see your routine care veterinarian to rule out any other medical cause for the symptoms, which might be reversed. But if your pet is diagnosed with CCD, the following tips may help:

  • Similar to puppy-proofing, senior-proof you home by making sure there are no spaces where he or she might get trapped. This may include gating off safe areas.
  • Use runners to help your dog remember the layout of the home. Dogs with dementia often end up in corners.
  • Place food at optimal heights to see.
  • Use night lights to minimize night time anxiety
  • Engage your dog with games and activity to stimulate his or her brain.
  • Even if you need assistive devices, include daily outdoor exercise, sunlight and play sessions.
  • Be aware for some dogs, dementia can also cause failure in animal-to-animal communication or increase aggression.

Most importantly, give yourself, and your loyal companion, the most pleasant present moments you can, and enjoy those sunset years.

Need help with a fur-friend suffering from CCD? Contact Us for an appointment.

 


In Memoriam – Lucky Rainey

March 23rd, 2019 by Laurie Brush

Lucky’s Story:
Lucky (aka Our Doofy) was adopted from Ionia Animal Shelter. We met Lucky after a couple dogs and fell for him immediately. We believe he truly appreciated being brought into a loving home and being treated as a family member. He let the kids do whatever with him. He was always physically close to us…had to follow us into any part of the house. He came out to the dog run and watched us as we drove away and slept by the door so he could greet us when we got home. He LOVED his family and we LOVED him. He should have lived longer than 14 years. He was strong and fit. A tumor the size of a chickpea on his spine was the culprit.

Thank you Dr Tay and Kathryn for your compassion and letting us say good-bye to Lucky the way we intended…at home, on his bed, with his family.

There is a void in our hearts and home. We miss you so much, Lucky, and love you even more. We know Grandma is taking care of you, boy.


In Memoriam – Delilah

March 23rd, 2019 by Laurie Brush

Deliah’s Story:
My dog, Delilah, was 17 years old. She had a bright and loving Spirit, but her body was old and giving out on her. We had to make the decision to let her go. She was a Corgi/Sheltie mix. She was, without a doubt, the sweetest dog EVER.

I found this quote in a book by Dr. Charlene M. Proctor. It has helped me; maybe it will help someone else:

My Pet knows that I am responsible for choosing the quality of its life. My love for this animal extends beyond any physical boundaries because love is forever. Therefore, my Pet and I exist forever. I trust that we will be together on the other side someday, and this parting is only temporary. I release this animal to the caretakers of its Spirit and trust that she is in a wonderful and peaceful place.

Dr. Brush and Mary in the office, were kind, understanding and compassionate. Their guidance and help during a difficult time was very much appreciated.


In Memoriam – Brody Morrison

March 21st, 2019 by Laurie Brush

Brody’s Story:
We adopted Brody from the Humane Society of West Olive in Michigan around nine years ago. We did a meet and greet with him in one of the Humane Society’s private offices after finding him online. They let him into the room and immediately he started running around, peeing on everything and trying to get away. It wasn’t until I had my wife leave the room, to go get another dog we were interested in, that Brody began to sell himself as though this was his last chance to get adopted. He sat for me. He laid down on command. I stuck my head out of the office and told my wife to come back. We fell in love in an instant.
Brody became best friends with our older dog Byron, and later with our newer dog Whiskey. The three have been inseparable since. Each dog had its own personality but Brody’s was mysterious. He liked playing with everyone but loved his alone time to sit outside in the sun and just be by himself.
We will miss Brody and all the love he has given throughout his life. We hope to see you once again when we can all run free in heaven together. We love you Brody.


BalanceIt: A Unique Approach to Nutrition for Companion Animals

February 13th, 2019 by Heaven At Home Staff

BalanceIt, a vet-guided nutrition companion for pets including senior dogs and cats in West Michigan

Many pet parents struggle to know the best food, and method to feed their companion animals. Commercial pet food recalls can be scary, as can news about the FDA investigating boutique & grain-free dog food as a potential cause of hidden heart disease.

Veterinarians typically recommend commercial or prescription foods that meet these guidelines developed by the World Small Animal Veterinary Association:

  1. Food is formulated by full-time, board-certified Ph.D. veterinarian nutritionists.
  2. Food is manufactured by a company that conducts extensive live feeding trials.
  3. Company’s R&D team publishes peer-reviewed research.

Yet well-meaning pet food stores often direct pet parents toward heavily marketed boutique brands that do not meet these guidelines. Read the rest of this entry »


 
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